multi-site indieweb

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Multi-site Indieweb is a hybrid approach to Indieweb in which a wide range of people have two (or more) indieweb enabled platforms for a multitude of reasons.


Contents

Brainstorming

  • Surely there's a better nomenclature for this concept and it will surely grow as generation 2+ join the movement and begin experimenting. What are other (better?) potential names for this idea?
  • Is it a good/bad idea? What are the pros/cons?

Reasoning

People may have one or more reasons for using multiple IndieWeb enabled platforms in tandem, some of which may or may not include:

  • Dogfooding one project (usually evolving), while simultaneously enjoying the immediate benefits of other (potentially more robust projects) while also testing out alternate UX/UI configurations.
  • Having a broader array of posting options and functionalities, while still owning their content
  • Personal implementation of some features can be daunting (particularly for Generations 2+) and the overriding value of the IndieWeb philosophy has them doing what they can to be a part of the movement
  • They got carried away with owning all the things
  • They highlight different parts of their online identity through their different sites. Like eg. one highlighting their personal life, one highlighting their professional one, one highlighting their very obscure hobby etc.
  • ...


Indieweb Examples

  • Kevin Marks has both kevinmarks.com and a Known site
  • Chris Aldrich uses WordPress on his primary site, but utilizes Known for shorter form content, particularly for status updates and mobile workflows on a secondary site. The WordPress site was one of his first and was primarily longer form content. While it was relatively indieweb-able with plugins, in the early days Known provided a lot more bug-free indieweb experience, particularly for syndicating short form content out to a variety of social silos. With some additional recent development on his WordPress site for better separation of content and additional methods of subscription so that readers/followers weren't inundated with content they might not necessarily want to read, more content is being generated from WordPress, but he still prefers to use Known in particular for short form replies which send better formed webmentions due to some quirks in his WordPress theme and associated plugins.
  • Jeremy Cherfas has multiple sites with various levels of IndieMark on various platforms. He's a self-professed member of Generation 2 or possibly 3. At the moment I have project-specific sites running under WordPress (fornacalia for bread making, Eat This Podcast for podcasting, and the Agricultural Biodiversity Weblog, a kind of news-aggregator where a colleague now provides most of the content and I manage the site). None of the WP websites is currently IndieWeb enabled. Two of the sites have Twitter users as well. All this is historical and predates me learning about IndieWeb, and I am still not sure how best to integrate everything, or even whether that would be worthwhile.
  • Scott Kingery primarily uses WordPress but in February 2017 began toying with Known.
  • Pelle Wessman has both voxpelli.com and kodfabrik.se, both static pages. The first one is newer and the home of his personal blog. The later one is older and home to his freelance/professional profile and, for legacy reasons, his e-mail and his online identity.
  • Martijn van der Ven separates his blog on licit.li from his online identity on vanderven.se/martijn/. The latter has expressed his identity for over 10 years and that will never been taken over by a blog or other type of website.
  • ...

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