Wired - Meet the Hackers Who Want to Jailbreak the Internet

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This is a page for keeping track of corrections (small, medium, or large) to the article:

Contents


As of 2013-08-14 13:00

(some items from the 6:30 version were fixed, a few remain, noted below)

Paragraph 4 starting with They call it

Paragraph 4 starting with: "They call it the Indie Web movement,"

  • "The movement grew out of an egalitarian online project launched by Fitzpatrick, before he made the move to Google."
    Correction:
    "The movement grew out of the 2010 Federated Social Web Summit held in Portland, when participants Aaron Parecki and Tantek Çelik were inspired to start a community that was more creator-centric."

This sentence in the article is misleading. Though Brad Fitzpatrick has made amazing contributions to the web and continues to do so (see his Wikipedia page), and many ideas he's helped popularize have been re-used, the "Indie Web movement" is not one of them nor even a direct descendant.
The IndieWeb movement in particular started in 2011 - Brad didn't participate until the 2013 IndieWebCamp. Similar ideas have popped up since at least 1997.

Paragraph 5 starting with On any given

Paragraph 5 starting with: "On any given day,"

  • "On any given day, you’ll find about 30 or 40 of them on an IRC chat channel, "
    Correction:
    "On any given day, you’ll find about 40-50 of them on an IRC chat channel, "

There's been 40-50 people on the IRC channel for quite some time, certainly since when the 2013 camp took place. As of today there's 60+ people in the channel (thanks in no doubt to a few more folks joining from the Wired article).

A Web You Can Call Your Own paragraph 1

Section "A Web You Can Call Your Own" paragraph 1 starting with "IndieWebCamp began in 2011,"

  • "... its roots to a moment in 2001, when Fitzpatrick open sourced the code for LiveJournal, giving anyone the power to run the blogging tool on their own computer servers."
    Correction:
    "... its roots to a moment in 1999, when Evan Williams launched Blogger, giving anyone the power to blog on their own domain."

The key here is IndieWeb is about owning your data on your own domain, how you do that (open source, or SaaS) is an implementation detail. That ability (owning your data on your domain) was first popularized by Blogger's FTP client.[1]

Revolution Remade paragraph 2 starting with Sadly

Section "Revolution Remade", paragraph 2 starting with “Sadly, Diaspora co-founder”

  • "…Mark.io, a very different project."
    Correction:
    "... Makr.io, a very different project."

Minor correction, text should be "Makr.io" — the hyperlink itself is correct, only the text is wrong in the article.

... more corrections here ...

Follow the "Paragraph n starting with x y z" heading style above, and * <blockquote>"..."</blockquote> Correction: <br>"..." markup style.


As of 2013-08-14 6:30

Corrections as of 2013-08-14 6:30am (original publication time):

Paragraph 4 starting with They call it

Paragraph 4 starting with: "They call it the Indie Web movement,"

  • "The movement grew out of an egalitarian online project launched by Fitzpatrick, before he made the move to Google."
    Correction:
    "The movement grew out of the 2010 Federated Social Web Summit held in Portland, when participants Aaron Parecki and Tantek Çelik were inspired to start a community that was more creator-centric."

This sentence in the article is misleading. Though Brad Fitzpatrick has made amazing contributions to the web and continues to do so (see his Wikipedia page), and many ideas he's helped popularize have been re-used, the "Indie Web movement" is not one of them nor even a direct descendant.
The IndieWeb movement in particular started in 2011 - Brad didn't participate until the 2013 IndieWebCamp. Similar ideas have popped up since at least 1997.

Paragraph 5 starting with On any given

Paragraph 5 starting with: "On any given day,"

  • "On any given day, you’ll find about 30 or 40 of them on an IRC chat channel, "
    Correction:
    "On any given day, you’ll find about 40-50 of them on an IRC chat channel, "

A Web You Can Call Your Own paragraph 1

Section "A Web You Can Call Your Own" paragraph 1 starting with "IndieWebCamp began in 2011,"

  • "... its roots to a moment in 2001, when Fitzpatrick open sourced the code for LiveJournal, giving anyone the power to run the blogging tool on their own computer servers."
    Correction:
    "... its roots to a moment in 1999, when Evan Williams launched Blogger, giving anyone the power to blog on their own domain."

The key here is IndieWeb is about owning your data on your own domain, how you do that (open source, or SaaS) is an implementation detail. That ability (owning your data on your domain) was first popularized by Blogger's FTP client.[2]

A Web You Can Call Your Own paragraph 6

  • "... and DiSo, short ..."
    Correction:
    "... and DiSo, short ..."

Note: article text is correct but link is not. "DiSo" should link to project home page:

Fixed as of 13:00.

Revolution Remade paragraph 2 starting with Sadly

Section "Revolution Remade", paragraph 2 starting with “Sadly, Diaspora co-founder”

  • "…Mark.io, a very different project."
    Correction:
    "... Makr.io, a very different project."

Minor correction, text should be "Makr.io" — the hyperlink itself is correct, only the text is wrong.

Spelling of Çelik

In many places, Çelik is incorrectly spelled Celik.

Fixed as of 13:00.

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