giving-credit

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giving credit is a collection of cultural practices related to acknowledging and attributing text, hyperlinks, quotes, utterances to others, typically by name, as a way of recognizing their contribution(s).

Citations

Main article: citations

Perhaps the most common form of giving credit is directly citing (and linking to, for online source) the source of some text, concepts, or ideas.

Via

When passing on or repeating text and/or URLs on Twitter (or POSSEed notes) from a source on Twitter, the person repeating the content often uses "via: " literally in text (without quotes), followed by that person's Twitter @-name, rather than citing the specific tweet.

There are two possible (likely?) reasons for saying "via: @name" instead of "via: https://twitter.com/.../status/...":

  • It takes less space in a tweet to do an @-mention (just the literal number of characters in the @-name plus the @, thus max 17) than a URL (Twitter t.cos http URLs into 22 characters, and https URLs into 23 characters)
  • Provide an embedded preview for the shared link rather than tweet - if you pass on a hyperlink and also hyperlink to the original tweet, Twitter will show only an embedded preview for the last link in your Tweet, and thus the original tweet rather than the material being passed along.

Alternate syntaxes:

  • sometimes "via " (without a ":") is used instead of "via: " to save one character in a tweet.
  • a few folks use the slashtag "/via " instead of "via: ". Same number of characters, unconventional punctuation.

Hat-tip

When passing on or repeating text and/or URLs on Twitter from someone who provided the information but not on Twitter (perhaps they spoke it outloud, provided it in IM/IRC to you, or provided it in some other online source that is lengthier or on another or more general topic), the person repeating the content sometimes uses "hat-tip: " followed by the person's Twitter @-name. More often the abbreviation "ht: " is used to save space.

The same reason(s) as for using "via:" can justify using "ht:" with @-name instead of linking to a permalink or some other sort.

Alternate syntax(es):

  • sometimes "ht " (without a ":") is used instead of "ht: " to save one character in a tweet.
  • a few folks use the slashtag "/ht " instead of "ht: ". Same number of characters, unconventional punctuation.

Crediting Applications

Some websites publicly credit the application used to create a piece of content. Typically this is indicated with text such as "via" or "from" near where the date of the post is displayed.

IndieWeb Examples

Aaron Parecki

p3k credits applications by adding "posted using [application]" in the footer of post permalinks.

p3k-credit-application.png

The text shown is the application's Micropub client_id, and since the application's access token makes the request to create the post, p3k knows which application created the post and can show the appropriate client_id.

Twitter

Twitter used to credit the application used to post a tweet by adding "via [application]" immediately after the date of the tweet.

twitter-credit-application.png

In 2012, Twitter stopped displaying the name of the application used to post a tweet.[1]

This is still available in [https://dev.twitter.com/rest/reference/get/statuses/user_timeline#%22source%22 their API, as the source of a tweet.

Facebook

Facebook credits applications by adding the application name after the time of the post with a single bullet separator.

facebook-credit-application.png

facebook-mobile-app-credit-application.png

Atom and activity streams

The Atom spec uses generator to credit the creating app, and Activity Streams distinguishes source generator and provider

See Also